Case Highlights: Community Advocacy for District of Columbia and Maryland Residents

Washington D.C.

  • Washington, D.C.: For several years, two neighborhood associations and dozens of residents near the 1300 block of Constitution Avenue, N.E. fought a legal and economic battle with Trant Liquors. Capitol Hill Restoration Society ("CHRS"), North Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association ("NLPNA"), and the neighbors claimed that Trant destroyed the peace, order and quiet of their neighborhood by, among other things, selling fortified alcohol to visibly intoxicated patrons, by providing drug paraphernalia to customers, and by allowing its parking lot and immediate surrounds to be used for drug dealing and other illegal activities. Despite such allegations and proof, the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board for the District of Columbia renewed Trant's license. Thereafter, Mr. Fierberg of our office was engaged to represent the citizens in appeals to the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. Two appeals to the Court of Appeals were successful. Trant lost its license, closed, and the property was converted to housing. Capitol Hill Restoration Society ("CHRS") and North Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association ("NLPNA").

  • Washington, D.C.: The Firm represented the Logan Park Association in its effort to cause revocation of a license held by F&W Market to sell beer and wine. The Association claimed that the establishment destroyed its peace, order and quiet by harboring drug traffickers within the establishment. Undercover police officers testified to numerous drug purchases inside the establishment in front of the store's owners. After several days of hearings, the District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board revoked F&W Market's license. Logan Circle Citizens' Association.

  • Washington, D.C.: For several years, two neighborhood associations and dozens of residents near the 1300 block of Constitution Avenue, N.E. fought a legal and economic battle with Trant Liquors. Capitol Hill Restoration Society ("CHRS"), North Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association ("NLPNA"), and the neighbors claimed that Trant destroyed the peace, order and quiet of their neighborhood by, among other things, selling fortified alcohol to visibly intoxicated patrons, by providing drug paraphernalia to customers, and by allowing its parking lot and immediate surrounds to be used for drug dealing and other illegal activities. Despite such allegations and proof, the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board for the District of Columbia renewed Trant's license. Thereafter, the Firm was engaged to represent the citizens in appeals to the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. Two appeals to the Court of Appeals were successful. Trant lost its license, closed, and the property was converted to housing. Capitol Hill Restoration Society ("CHRS") and North Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association ("NLPNA").

  • Washington, D.C.:  The Firm represented the Logan Park Association in its effort to cause revocation of a license held by F&W Market to sell beer and wine. The Association claimed that the establishment destroyed its peace, order and quiet by harboring drug traffickers within the establishment. Undercover police officers testified to numerous drug purchases inside the establishment in front of the store's owners. After several days of hearings, the District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board revoked F&W Market's license. Logan Circle Citizens' Association.

  • Washington, D.C.: The Firm represented the Kalorama Citizens' Association in its effort to establish a moratorium on the issuance of new alcoholic beverage licenses in the popular Adams Morgan area of the District of Columbia . The Association's purpose in seeking the moratorium was to stem the growth of restaurants and bars in favor of creating opportunities for other neighborhood businesses to develop and thrive. The Association prevailed after several days of contested hearings before the District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board. Kalorama Citizens' Association.

Maryland

  • Maryland: The Firm represented residents of a condominium association who filed suit alleging that portions of the Association's land were taken as a result of the defendants' development of a neighboring condominium building. Residents of the Association alleged that their properties had lost value and important "green space," and that critical access to their homes was being threatened by the development scheme. Settlement was reached compensating the Association and guaranteeing that access by its members to their homes would not be obstructed. Clients v. Leisureworld of Maryland and IDI Development Corporation.